Herbal Medicine to Heal Grief, Part Two

Sep 07, 2018

By April C Brader - Board Eligible Traditional Chinese Medicine Physician, Acupuncturist and Herbalist                                                                                                                  

Each spiritual healing tradition from around the world has its own unique herbs to help individuals manage grief. 

In traditional Chinese medicine, we usually use a comprehensive herbal formula consisting of several herbs based upon our ancient manuals (materia medica) and/or patient’s presentation, manifestations and symptoms. Some of the potential herbs we use in an herbal formula for the treatment of grief may include:

  1. He Huan Pi -- is from the Albizzia or Mimosa Tree, often called the “Tree of Happiness” for its amazing ability to nourish the heart and calm the spirit. It is often used for vexation, depression, palpitations, anxiety and insomnia. The pharmacological affects are sedative, hypnotic, and antidepressant, analgesic, anthelmintic, and diuretic.  He Huan Hua, or flower of the Albizzia Tree is used for dysphoria, forgetfulness, depression and grief.

 

  1. Shan Zha -- or Hawthorne -- is used to direct to the heart. It has a calmative effect and enhances circulation. It dispels stagnation, blood stasis and dilates blood...
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Herbal Medicine to Heal the Tidal Wave of Grief, Part One

Sep 06, 2018

By April C Brader                                                                                                                          

Board Eligible Acupuncturist and Traditional Chinese Medicine Herbalist 

The tidal wave of grief can be profound and overwhelming. It often comes without warning, plunging us into the depths of the psychic abyss. 

Grief is the universal equalizer as everyone we know--our entire family, our beloved friends and cherished pets-- will one day die. Grief is also a profound motivator. It compels us to examine our soul beliefs.  It rocks us to our core and opens the door to emotional, mental and spiritual transformation and even healing.

When I was a student in a graduate course on thanatology, the study of death and dying, our professor invited several parents who belonged to a support group for parents who lost children.  One toddler died of a rare heart defect, another adolescent died of cancer, one was killed in a terrible accident at home and the last child was tragically murdered.  

The guests spoke about the loss of their child with such emotional candor and intense, palpable grief that as they shared their stories, the entire class of graduate students in class were openly...

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Waiting To Die, Essay One

Sep 05, 2018

The bright realization that must come before death will be worth all the boredom of living.                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Ned Rorem  

What’s it like, waiting to die?   Of course, it’s different for everyone.   I can only say what it’s like for me. On the whole, it’s rather boring.  

Don’t get me wrong.  I still have many pleasures in life and – knock on silicon – I’m lucky not to be suffering from any fatal illness, though if I were, that would certainly add some drama in my life.  I could then follow the example of the poet Ted Rosenthal, who after contracting leukemia, joyfully called his friends and said, “Guess what’s happened to me!”  Well, no thanks.  I’ll take my boring life any day and intone a hymn of gratitude every morning I wake up with only the...

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Welcome to the RINGDOM

Sep 04, 2018

Introduction:  Hi, everyone. I think I should tell you a little bit about the column I’ll be writing monthly and that if you have the interest you’ll be reading – at least until your interest begins to flag.  You see, toward the end of last year, I wrote something, just as a lark, I called “Waiting to Die.” Well, I published it in a couple journals and on two websites of friends, and to my surprise, I received a lot of encouragement to write more such pieces.  So I did. I’ve now written a bunch of them, and in this column, I am going to start inflicting them on you, beginning with my maiden effort.

One advisory:  These essays are not morbid; they are meant to be humorous, at least some of the time.  And they usually end with something that I hope you will find to be of spiritual value, maybe even occasionally inspiring.  But, bottom line, which this almost is, they are meant mainly to be entertaining, and if occasionally they prove edifying, I hope you will forgive me.  

OK, you’re on your own.  Have fun and enjoy the ride.

Dr. Ken Ring's series of essays "Waiting to Die" debuts here tomorrow September 5, 2018.

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Dr. Ring is Professor Emeritus of psychology at the University of Connecticut where he researched near-death experiences. He designed scientifically structured studies of 102 near-death survivors that further developed Dr. Raymond Moody's early NDE findings. He is well-known for his ground-breaking research...

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A Telescope & A Compass for Our Journey

Sep 03, 2018

Hello, I am Dr. Raymond Moody. I am best known for having coined the term “near-death experience” in my bestselling book Life After Life. 

Welcome to Illuminating.

Illuminating is the blog of The University of Heaven, a new online platform for the rational exploration of the afterlife, launching September 20, 2018.

 Illuminating will be published twice a month with articles from leading-edge researchers and thinkers in the field of consciousness studies.

Featured Columnist Dr. Kenneth Ring

We are honored to be joined by Dr. Kenneth Ring, highly esteemed near-death-experience researcher and author of the bestselling Lessons from the Light and The Omega Project. His book Mindsight is a groundbreaking inquiry into the near-death experiences of the blind.

Ken's monthly column Notes from the Ringdom features his new series of essays “Waiting to Die” that offer an enlightening and humorous perspective on life and death from a man who has fully investigated both. The column will debut this Wednesday September 5 with a short introduction from Ken on Tuesday September 4th.  Keep your eyes open for what promises to be a compelling series of posts from a masterful writer and thoughtful researcher.

You can prepare for Ken’s column by reading more about him:

Kenneth Ring’s Website

Kenneth Ring on Wikipedia

Kenneth Ring on Love The Person You’re With

Kenneth Ring on Near-Death.com

Remedies for Grief

On Thursday and Friday September 6-7 we will publish a two-part series by April Brader. April offers all of us a...

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