DO BRAINS COMMUNICATE? AND HOW!!  

Do our brains communicate with one another? And how? 

Perhaps I should rephrase that by saying, and how!!! 

Of course we communicate through our brains which interpret our senses. That’s how we see, smell, hear, taste and feel. But I am talking about a sixth sense, one in which information is passed silently from brain to brain, as in extrasensory perception or during shared-death experiences. I have seen this form of communication in my own life and in the lives of others, and can tell you that it happens. Brains can communicate with one another although I truly don’t know if it is brains that do this --or that thing  known as the mind. Or. . . .?

In my own life, I experienced this brain communication when my mother died. And although it wasn’t a direct communication with her, it was communication through another person. Here’s what happened:

About 30 minutes before my mother died, I received a telephone call from Vernon Neppe, MD, the then director of neuropharmacology at University of Washington. I had once worked on a book project with Neppe about his fascinating research on déjà vu, but had not communicated with him for several years, so this call was no more expected than what he had to say.

 “Something strange happened this morning,” he said, sounding quizzical. “I was reading the newspaper and a voice came to me that said, ‘Call Paul Perry.’ I ignored it and a few minutes later it happened again, ‘Call Paul Perry.’ So here I am. What’s going on?”

My heart...

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OCTOBER 15, 2018 ASK RAYMOND with Pediatric NDE Researcher Melvin Morse M.D.

 

Do you have a question you would like to ask? My guests, columnists, and I are all glad to answer your questions. This month we are featuring Dr. Melvin Morse who has researched pediatric NDEs and the science of intuition.

Dear Raymond:

Actually, the idea of *never* ceasing to exist, ever, not after a million billion trillion quadrillion quintillion etc etc years, sounds Hellish to me. What's the endgame here?   Are we supposed to merge back with the Creator, or...?

Thank you,

Melissa

Melissa:
Melvin and I decided to answer your question together in this short video. Thank you so much for asking it!

 ******************** 

Dear Raymond:

I have a question about the emotional state of people after they die and are in the afterlife. Do those who have passed on, forgive people whom they believe have committed real and/or imagined acts against them?

I’m asking this because I’ve had family members pass away who were always upset with other family for various and sundry slights or actions they believed were committed against them. I want to believe that those family are at peace now, having forgotten or  forgiven others. Also, it would give me peace to know they are happy.

Sincerely, 

Holly Fox Vellekoop, MSN

Dear Holly:

My impression is that the life review in the experience of the dying is a sort of clearing process where all that gets sorted out and understood at another level. So, in sum, I don’t think people take grudges into the next life as they undergo a life review first.

The life review process changes the...

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Waiting to Die,Part II: One Flu Over the Dang Fool Test

[I actually wrote this last spring after my near near-death experience with the flu.   But since another flu season will soon be upon us, perhaps this cautionary tale is timely after all.  Its message is:  Don’t fool around with the flu this year, particularly if you are of an age.]

I might have been a tad too glib when in the first installment of what clearly will be a terminal series having to do with my personal terminus, I observed that at least for me waiting to die was rather boring. [I was also too glib about writing off Tiger Woods; I guess I shoulda known better.  O me of little faith…]

After this winter, I have had cause to change my mind.  For a while there, I thought it might be more of a matter of life or death.  I found myself thinking of the line Othello sings toward the end of Verdi’s opera as he contemplates his own death:  “Ecco la fine del mio camin.”  Colloquially, “This is the end of the line for me.”

You see, I was one of the millions who caught the flu bug or, rather, it caught me.  And held me tight for a while in what seemed to be its death-like grip.  It was really bad for a week or ten days there – it’s hard to remember how long.  Even now, five weeks to the day after becoming sick, I am still hawking and spitting up gobs of sputum, and my voice now resembles that of your nearby frog. There were times when I considered whether the first piece I wrote in the series might well turn out to be my epitaph.  And I admit there were moments, or...

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Heaven's Invitation: Live Fearlessly

by Lisa Smartt

"...the NDE may act like a benign virus, and by exposing yourself to it, you can catch it; that is, you can experience some of the same benefits as do those who actually have the NDE themselves."

Dr. Kenneth Ring Lessons from the Light p.5

As many of you know, I am the co-founder with Raymond Moody of The University of Heaven and The Final Words Project, an informal investigation into people’s last words. If you had told me ten years ago that I would be working with Raymond Moody to research final words, near-death, shared-death and after-death experiences, I would have looked at you cross-eyed. What? Who? Huh?

Now let me give you a quick before and after:

Before:  You know that person on an airplane who is pale white and clutching at the safety belt...and the plane has not even taken off yet? That was me a decade ago before doing this research.

After: Surprised by my own comfort in the clouds, I know that when my time is here, I will be ushered to a place of peace and familiar safety. If I am in an airplane when it happens, I will be even closer to the heavens.

Before I began final words research, I spent most of my time on a plane white-knuckling my way through the friendly skies. Matter of fact, I white-knuckled my way through much of my life. However, then six years ago, after the death of my father, I immersed myself in better understanding what happens when we die through gathering and analyzing people’s final words. That work led me to read everything I could about near-death experiences.

I caught the...

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Raymond Moody+ The University of Heaven = The Intellectual Ride of My Life

By Paul Perry

There is no way to express the debt of gratitude I have for Raymond Moody, MD, PhD. And that includes all the initials that follow his name. As a medical doctor he has diagnosed my ailments or explained those of others in a simple, patient and complete way that I wish existed in all who practice his profession.

As a PhD in philosophy, Raymond has explained the fine points of the near-death experience so clearly and completely that I have been able to write five books with him (fifteen in total) on the lively subjects contained in the world of near-death studies. Sometimes when I need company I will put on an audio tape from the good doctor and listen again to what he had to say about Greek philosophy, some odd-ball mental disease or, oh yes, our work, which is why I was recording him to begin with.

Being around Raymond is always educational and never confrontational. He’s the perfect teacher and most of all, the perfect friend.

And he’s wacky. He not only wanted to be a comedian, he has even taken the stage to entertain his colleagues, exploring the mysterious world of laughter one joke at a time. And yes, he has a comedy record album too, an item so extinct that he doesn’t even have a copy. If you have one let me know so I can convince him to reissue it. After all, aside from national politics, there isn’t enough humor in this world.

I first met Raymond through our mutual book agent, Nat Sobel. Nat had ushered Life After Life through a difficult publishing process, a time when most publishers would not publish a book about near-death...

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Heaven is Here Today

Today is one of the most exciting days of my 74 years because I have great news to share: 

The University of Heaven has launched...and we are delighted that you are a part.

The University of Heaven offers paid and complimentary opportunities for exploring  near-death, shared-death and after-death research through live events and pre-recorded courses with those at the leading edge of consciousness studies.

On OCTOBER 30 7-8 pm ET, I will be presenting IM CONVINCED a free webinar that explores the rational reasons and astonishing accounts that led to my only recently conceding: Indeed, consciousness survives.

Register here for I’m Convinced to find out more about the five-decade journey that has led me to conclude that there is an afterlife.

 

On November 13th  at 7 pm ET, our six-month seminar series, The NDE Consciousness Forum, launches with our first forum The Mindful Universe with Eben Alexander and Karen NewellOther forums will feature  Jeffery Olsen, Dr. Jeff O’Driscoll, Dr. Melvin Morse, Kevin Braheny Fortune of Hearts of Space, Dr. Tony Cicoria, Dr. Mary Neal and Dr. Rachel Harris.

For much of my life, I have been the subject of interviews across the world. And now, I look forward, to being the one asking the questions to some of the world's most interesting and well-informed researchers and thinkers in the area of consciousness studies. Join me for interviews and interactive experiences with these leading-edge thinkers at the frontiers of spirituality and science.

Do you have a book idea but...

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Herbal Medicine to Heal Grief, Part Two

Uncategorized Sep 07, 2018

By April C Brader - Board Eligible Traditional Chinese Medicine Physician, Acupuncturist and Herbalist                                                                                                                  

Each spiritual healing tradition from around the world has its own unique herbs to help individuals manage grief. 

In traditional Chinese medicine, we usually use a comprehensive herbal formula consisting of several herbs based upon our ancient manuals (materia medica) and/or patient’s presentation, manifestations and symptoms. Some of the potential herbs we use in an herbal formula for the treatment of grief may include:

  1. He Huan Pi -- is from the Albizzia or Mimosa Tree, often called the “Tree of Happiness” for its amazing ability to nourish the heart and calm the spirit. It is often used for vexation, depression, palpitations, anxiety and insomnia. The pharmacological affects are sedative, hypnotic, and antidepressant, analgesic, anthelmintic, and diuretic.  He Huan Hua, or flower of the Albizzia Tree is used for dysphoria, forgetfulness, depression and grief.

 

  1. Shan Zha -- or Hawthorne -- is used to direct to the heart. It has a calmative effect and enhances circulation. It dispels stagnation, blood stasis and dilates blood...
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Herbal Medicine to Heal the Tidal Wave of Grief, Part One

By April C Brader                                                                                                                          

Board Eligible Acupuncturist and Traditional Chinese Medicine Herbalist 

The tidal wave of grief can be profound and overwhelming. It often comes without warning, plunging us into the depths of the psychic abyss. 

Grief is the universal equalizer as everyone we know--our entire family, our beloved friends and cherished pets-- will one day die. Grief is also a profound motivator. It compels us to examine our soul beliefs.  It rocks us to our core and opens the door to emotional, mental and spiritual transformation and even healing.

When I was a student in a graduate course on thanatology, the study of death and dying, our professor invited several parents who belonged to a support group for parents who lost children.  One toddler died of a rare heart defect, another adolescent died of cancer, one was killed in a terrible accident at home and the last child was tragically murdered.  

The guests spoke about the loss of their child with such emotional candor and intense, palpable grief that as they shared their stories, the entire class of graduate students in class were openly...

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Waiting To Die, Essay One

The bright realization that must come before death will be worth all the boredom of living.                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Ned Rorem  

What’s it like, waiting to die?   Of course, it’s different for everyone.   I can only say what it’s like for me. On the whole, it’s rather boring.  

Don’t get me wrong.  I still have many pleasures in life and – knock on silicon – I’m lucky not to be suffering from any fatal illness, though if I were, that would certainly add some drama in my life.  I could then follow the example of the poet Ted Rosenthal, who after contracting leukemia, joyfully called his friends and said, “Guess what’s happened to me!”  Well, no thanks.  I’ll take my boring life any day and intone a hymn of gratitude every morning I wake up with only the...

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Welcome to the RINGDOM

Introduction:  Hi, everyone. I think I should tell you a little bit about the column I’ll be writing monthly and that if you have the interest you’ll be reading – at least until your interest begins to flag.  You see, toward the end of last year, I wrote something, just as a lark, I called “Waiting to Die.” Well, I published it in a couple journals and on two websites of friends, and to my surprise, I received a lot of encouragement to write more such pieces.  So I did. I’ve now written a bunch of them, and in this column, I am going to start inflicting them on you, beginning with my maiden effort.

One advisory:  These essays are not morbid; they are meant to be humorous, at least some of the time.  And they usually end with something that I hope you will find to be of spiritual value, maybe even occasionally inspiring.  But, bottom line, which this almost is, they are meant mainly to be entertaining, and if occasionally they prove edifying, I hope you will forgive me.  

OK, you’re on your own.  Have fun and enjoy the ride.

Dr. Ken Ring's series of essays "Waiting to Die" debuts here tomorrow September 5, 2018.

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Dr. Ring is Professor Emeritus of psychology at the University of Connecticut where he researched near-death experiences. He designed scientifically structured studies of 102 near-death survivors that further developed Dr. Raymond Moody's early NDE findings. He is well-known for his ground-breaking research...

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